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20121202
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storm. >> if sandy were to come close r directly into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that nnec us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pb
than expected in the wake of hurricane sandy and fiscal cliff anxiety. >> so it looks like sandy will not affect the numbers even after revisions. >> reporter: georgetown's harry holzer, former chief economist for the labor department. >> in terms of the fiscal cliff, so far we are not seeing any big impact. >> reporter: not even an impact on retail which, for all the talk of online supplanting bricks-and-mortar buying, added 53,000 jobs last month-- much of it holiday hiring, no doubt-- but a healthy 140,000 overall increase in the past three months. not all the new numbers were festive, however. construction shed 20,000 jobs, though perhaps influenced by sandy. manufacturing dropped 7,000. grinchier still, job growth in september and october was revised down by 49,000 jobs. and for all the talk of a lower unemployment rate, its explanation seemed to be that several hundred thousand more americans stopped looking for work in november and were counted out of the labor force. again, economist holtzer. >> this month's change was driven completely by the fact some people stopped loo
by the architect of this model, sandy wiel, saying we should break up the big banks. gwen, i think it tells us more about the end of the era of kind of this force conglomeration of bank where's bigger is naturally better. you have seen, obviously, too big to fail banks become too bigger to fail, such as j.p.morgan, or wells fargo which bought wachovia. but there are others who find they can't hit their stride with the asset they say accummed a decade ago. >> ifill: what we're watching happening at citigroup. does that make them an outlier or a sign of things to come? >> i think it's a little bit of both. citigroup, let's not forget, had to go in for two rounds of bailout money. there was even scuttlebut that the white house suggested this was a bank that should fail, that it was beyond rescue. it still has $1 fent billion of bad seeftz its sheets it's looking to get rid of. there are no easy answers for it. there is no overnight turnaround. and at the same time, it's a public company and shareholders are saying, "show me the progress." >> ifill: roben farzhad of "bloomberg business week," thank you
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